Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Palliative Care and Hospice Nursing Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

M Sara Rosenthal

University of Kentucky | USA

Keynote: Truthful prognostication: How to talk to patients about devastating diagnoses and end of life

Time : 9:30-10:15

OMICS International Palliative Care 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker M Sara Rosenthal photo
Biography:

Rosenthal is an expert in clinical ethics, moral distress and research ethics, with special interests in endocrine ethics and reproductive ethics. Rosenthal is the author of over 50 publications, including peer-reviewed articles, blog posts, and consumer trade books on diabetes, thyroid disease and a range of women's health issues. She has served on several clinical practice guidelines as bioethicist; has been the consulting bioethicist to NGOs, and is Past Chair of the American Thyroid Association's Ethics Advisory Committee. Rosenthal has been quoted by the science and health media such as Discover Magazine and CNN, has appeared on TV and news shows to discuss current bioethical issues, and has delivered over 150 ethics presentations nationally and internationally.

Abstract:

Breaking bad news is part of everyday clinical care, but it’s such a difficult conversation, many healthcare providers are more skilled at avoiding these discussions than having these discussions. More commonly, healthcare providers may procrastinate such discussions until it becomes too late for the patient to act on the information effectively. Avoidance of truthful prognostication is one of the chief drivers of patient suffering at the end of life, healthcare provider moral distress (see www.moraldistressproject.org), and increased healthcare costs at the end of life. Current Medicare reimbursement rules have recognized the need for these discussions. This presentation will help participants understand how to initiate these dialogues using Best Practices from the clinical ethics and end of life literature. 

Objectives:
Review core ethical principles and medico-legal issues involved in breaking bad news and end of life dialogue.
Identify best practices in truth-telling and truthful prognostication.
Discuss best practices in Goals of Care and Advance Care Planning discussions.

Breaking bad news is part of everyday clinical care, but it’s such a difficult conversation, many healthcare providers are more skilled at avoiding these discussions than having these discussions. More commonly, healthcare providers may procrastinate such discussions until it becomes too late for the patient to act on the information effectively. Avoidance of truthful prognostication is one of the chief drivers of patient suffering at the end of life, healthcare provider moral distress (see www.moraldistressproject.org), and increased healthcare costs at the end of life. Current Medicare reimbursement rules have recognized the need for these discussions. This presentation will help participants understand how to initiate these dialogues using Best Practices from the clinical ethics and end of life literature. 

Objectives:
Review core ethical principles and medico-legal issues involved in breaking bad news and end of life dialogue.
Identify best practices in truth-telling and truthful prognostication.
Discuss best practices in Goals of Care and Advance Care Planning discussions.

OMICS International Palliative Care 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Joanne Reid photo
Biography:

Joanne Reid is a Reader (Associate Professor) in Cancer Nursing. She is a prominent Researcher in palliative care as evidenced by her publications in both professional and leading international journals, leadership of successful funding bids, and research awards. She has led qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research which aims to improve the quality of life of palliative care patients and their lay and professional carers, along with improving palliative/end-of-life care education. Her work had informed national end -of- life guidelines, she sits on several editorial boards and is Associate Editor with BMC Palliative care and is an External Examiner in the European Certificate in essential palliative care course.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Music therapy is increasingly being used as a palliative therapy, with the primary aim of improving people’s quality of life. To date, primarily because of a paucity of robust research, the evidence for music therapy’s effectiveness on patient reported outcomes is positive but weak, and no guidelines have been developed. The primary aim of this pilot study is to test the feasibility of administering the McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQOL) in terms of acceptability to hospice inpatients, and whether attrition affects the viability of a three week music therapy intervention in order to calculate the sample size required for a phase III randomized trial. The secondary aim is to evaluate the potential effectiveness of music therapy for improving the quality of life of hospice inpatients.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: A pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) supplemented with qualitative methods with n=52 hospice inpatients was considered. Baseline data collection included the MQOL and socio-demographic data. Participants in the intervention arms were offered two 30-45 minute sessions of music therapy per week for three consecutive weeks, in addition to care as usual. Participants in the control arm received care as usual. Follow-up measures administered at 1, 3 and 5-weeks. Qualitative data collection involved focus group/interviews with HCPs and careers.

Findings: At present we are approaching 75% of our recruitment target (recruitment extended until July 2017). The quantitative findings of this feasibility trial help to ascertain the viability of the music therapy intervention for this population and the most appropriate follow period.  Qualitative data from practitioners, patients and their family members support music therapy interventions in a palliative care in-patient hospice setting.

Conclusion & Significance: Findings from this study will inform the design of a phase III multi-site RCT. Findings in relation to the potential effectiveness of music therapy will provide support for NHS and third sector Specialist Palliative Care commissioners and service providers to make an evidence-based decision on whether to incorporate music therapy in palliative care services.

Break: Networking & Refreshments Break @ Foyer 11:05-11:30